Future Talk ~ 02/08/18 ~ Future Trek ~ Who Are The Homeless? Hosts Janet Kira Lessin & Karen Christine Patrick

02/08/18 ~ Future Trek ~ Who Are The Homeless? Hosts Janet Kira Lessin & Karen Christine Patrick

Basicincome.org

The mission of the Basic Income Earth Network (BIEN) is to offer education to the wider public about alternative arguments about, proposals for, and problems concerning basic income as an idea, institution, and public policy practice. To this end, BIEN organizes public conferences around the world on an annual basis in which empirical research and new ideas are disseminated and discussed. BIEN promotes and serves as a repository of published research, including congress papers, an academic blog featuring balanced debate for and against the basic income proposal in different contexts and forms, and by means of an independent academic journal linked with BIEN – Basic Income Studies. BIEN does not subscribe to any particular version of basic income and fosters evidenced-based research, plural debate, and critical engagement about basic income and related ideas and public policy developments. Individuals connected with BIEN – including affiliated organizations – may express particular opinions about basic income, but they are not opinions of BIEN. BIEN’s explicit mission is to remain neutral among competing arguments for and against basic income and the relation of basic income with other ideas and policies.

This U.S. City Will Give Its Poorest People $500 a Month — No Strings Attached

Full article at http://time.com/money/5114349/universal-basic-income-stockton/

The mayor of Stockton, Calif. wants to provide a universal basic income for the city’s poorest residents.

Starting this year, an experimental program called the Stockton Economic Empowerment Demonstration (SEED) will pay $500 a month to a few hundred of the city’s low-income residents, no strings attached.

The idea behind universal basic income, or UBI, is to provide a degree of economic security for the most vulnerable people in a community. The goal is to counteract the destabilizing forces of globalization and technological innovation that have lead to job loss and wage stagnation for countless workers, according to CNBC.

A lot of big names in Silicon Valley support UBI — Mark Zuckerberg advocated for the concept in his commencement speech at Harvard in 2017. Another Facebook executive who supports providing people with free money and no restrictions is Chris Hughes, who personally donated $1 million to the Economic Security Project, a program he co-chairs, which will provide funding for Stockton’s program to get off the ground this year.

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Well, human activity has always happened with or without structured paid jobs, example of unpaid family caregivers, but this article frames the changes in our ideas of work well. At my age of 56, I can see the span of how profoundly work has changed from the farm society of my grandparents’ childhood where everybody labored for the common provision, interrupted by War and then the industrial age. Then where we got, as defined in this article, the “Prince Charming” patriarch jobs that “paid for everything,” to tapeworm capitalism that roped in both men and women into creating profit for oligarchs. Employment is now terminating into “bullshit jobs” giving way to technological unemployment effects. That is a tremendous amount of change. Why I support a #basicincomeis because structured jobs for human provisioning has become to precariously volatile to be secure for living on.

Post-work: the radical idea of a world without jobs

Full article: https://www.theguardian.com/news/2018/jan/19/post-work-the-radical-idea-of-a-world-without-jobs?CMP=share_btn_fb

Work has ruled our lives for centuries, and it does so today more than ever. But a new generation of thinkers insists there is an alternative. By 

Work is the master of the modern world. For most people, it is impossible to imagine society without it. It dominates and pervades everyday life – especially in Britain and the US – more completely than at any time in recent history. An obsession with employability runs through education. Even severely disabled welfare claimants are required to be work-seekers. Corporate superstars show off their epic work schedules. “Hard-working families” are idealised by politicians. Friends pitch each other business ideas. Tech companies persuade their employees that round-the-clock work is play. Gig economy companies claim that round-the-clock work is freedom. Workers commute further, strike less, retire later. Digital technology lets work invade leisure.

In all these mutually reinforcing ways, work increasingly forms our routines and psyches, and squeezes out other influences. As Joanna Biggs put it in her quietly disturbing 2015 book All Day Long: A Portrait of Britain at Work, “Work is … how we give our lives meaning when religion, party politics and community fall away.”

As a source of subsistence, let alone prosperity, work is now insufficient for whole social classes. In the UK, almost two-thirds of those in poverty – around 8 million people – are in working households. In the US, the average wage has stagnated for half a century.

As a source of social mobility and self-worth, work increasingly fails even the most educated people – supposedly the system’s winners. In 2017, half of recent UK graduates were officially classified as “working in a non-graduate role”. In the US, “belief in work is crumbling among people in their 20s and 30s”, says Benjamin Hunnicutt, a leading historian of work. “They are not looking to their job for satisfaction or social advancement.” (You can sense this every time a graduate with a faraway look makes you a latte.)

Work is increasingly precarious: more zero-hours or short-term contracts; more self-employed people with erratic incomes; more corporate “restructurings” for those still with actual jobs. As a source of sustainable consumer booms and mass home-ownership – for much of the 20th century, the main successes of mainstream western economic policy – work is discredited daily by our ongoing debt and housing crises. For many people, not just the very wealthy, work has become less important financially than inheriting money or owning a home.

 

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