Andrew Collins Interview ~ 08/24/14 ~ We the Anunnaki

Andrew-CollinsHosts Janet Kira Lessin & Dr. Sasha Lessin interview author/researcher Andrew Collins on We the Anunnaki, Sunday, August 24, 2014 from 10 AM to 12 Noon, HST (Hawaii time), 1 to 3 PM Pacific, 4 to 6 PM Eastern on www.blogtalkradio.com/aquarianradio.

Andrew Collins joins us to talk about his new book, Göbekli Tepe: Genesis of the Gods: The Temple of the Watchers and the Discovery of Eden. We discuss all facets of his new book, as well as connections to other lines of research. We discuss the site itself, the evidence of who may have built it, who the Annunaki really may have been, elongated skulls, giants, and much, much more.

Andrew is a prolific author, who has been writing about the world surrounding Gobekli Tepe since the mid-90’s. His books, From the Ashes of Angels, Gods of Eden, and The Cygnus Mystery all lead up to his latest work.

.

From Wikipedia

Göbekli Tepe (Turkish: [ɡøbe̞kli te̞pɛ],[2] “Potbelly Hill”[3]) is an archaeological site at the top of a mountain ridge in the Southeastern Anatolia Region of Turkey, approximately 6 km (4 mi) northeast of the town of Şanlıurfa. The tell has a height of 15 m (49 ft) and is about 300 m (984 ft) in diameter.[4] It is approximately 760 m (2,493 ft) above sea level. It has been excavated by a German archaeological team that was under the direction of Klaus Schmidt from 1996 until his death in 2014.

The tell includes two phases of ritual use dating back to the 10th-8th millennium BCE. During the first phase (Pre-Pottery Neolithic A (PPNA)), circles of massive T-shaped stone pillars were erected. More than 200 pillars in about 20 circles are currently known through geophysical surveys. Each pillar has a height of up to 6 m (20 ft) and a weight of up to 20 tons. They are fitted into sockets that were hewn out of the bedrock.[5] In the second phase (Pre-pottery Neolithic B (PPNB)), the erected pillars are smaller and stood in rectangular rooms with floors of polished lime. The site was abandoned after the PPNB-period. Younger structures date to classical times.

The function of the structures is not yet clear. Excavator Klaus Schmidt believed that they are early neolithic sanctuaries.

Leave a Reply

%d bloggers like this: